Laravel 4 Cookbook

What This Book Teaches I’m writing this book (and the tutorials) in the hope that people can learn the things I have about Laravel 4. It’s not meant as a replacement for any of the great Laravel books, but instead as a complement to the resources, documentation and framework. This book teaches various aspects of … Continue reading “Laravel 4 Cookbook”

Laravel 4 Cookbook
Christopher Pitt and Taylor Otwell

What This Book Teaches

I’m writing this book (and the tutorials) in the hope that people can learn the things I have about Laravel 4. It’s not meant as a replacement for any of the great Laravel books, but instead as a complement to the resources, documentation and framework.
This book teaches various aspects of Laravel 4 implementation, configuration and usage; as part of separate projects. The idea is not to demonstrate the only or best way to create any of these projects.
It’s not to show the only or best way to use Laravel 4. It’s simply a different (and subjective) kind of documentation to the modularised version found at: http://laravel.com/docs While this book touches on in the installation and hosting of Laravel applications; it’s not an
exhaustive reference for how to do these things. There are some instructions; which should be enough to get you up and running, but it assumes you are familiar with how things like LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP) work and are capable of installing and maintaining them.

Why Write This Book
I was learning how to use Laravel 4 more effectively, and found some subjects which I felt were worth sharing. I picked Medium (which later turned out to be a huge pain) and started putting a tutorial together. A few hours later I hit publish…
Then @laravelphp retweeted a link to the article. I think I spent the rest of the day just watching stats. The tutorial hit Medium’s home page. It turns out there are a lot of people who wanted to know about Authentication (in Laravel), and just needed to be exposed to the article through @laravelphp’s promotion of it.
Since then; I have been releasing a tutorial every two weeks.
The book grew out of the realisation that; while loads of people were reading the tutorials on Medium, some people weren’t happy with the platform.
There are many compelling reasons for me to keep on using Medium to host the tutorials. I don’t want to host my own thing because uptime is important, and outages in the night add years onto my life. The simple statistics and text formatting are also great.
I want to stay on Medium, but I also want people to want to read the tutorials and learn from them on other platforms. The book allows both of these things, as well as an important third thing…
The book is also intended as a means to give back to Laravel; in particular the invaluable work of Taylor Otwell. To this end, I have committed to give half of all sales to Taylor. The tutorials will always be free on Medium, and their content will mirror the chapters of this book (with obvious repetition omitted), but by purchasing this book you are helping to fund future Laravel development from him and tutorials from me.

Mathematica Cookbook

Mathematica cookbook
Introduction

If you were stranded on a desert island with only your laptop (and presumably a large solar panel), what software would you want to have with you? For me the answer definitely includes the latest version of Wolfram Mathematica. Whether you are a scientist, engineer, or mathematician, a Wall Street quant, a statistician or programmer, or even an artist or musician, you will be a better one if you have this tool at your disposal. Of course, having a tool and knowing how to use it well are quite different things. That is why I wrote the Mathematica Cookbook.
I am abig fan of O’Reilly cookbooks, as these books are designed to help you solve real-world problems. Mathematica is an ideal candidate for a cookbook because it is so vast, deep, and full of traps for the novice. I was ecstatic to learn that O’Reilly was looking to publish a Mathematica cookbook and even more excited when I was chosen to be its author. I have been a use r of Mathematica since version 3.0. Although that was over 13 years ago, I still remember the frustration of trying to solve problems in this system. I don’t mean this in a derogatory way. The frustration a newbie experiences when trying to learn Mathematica comes from the knowledge that you are sitting in front of a highly advanced computational platform that eventually will magnify your productivity tenfold—if you can only wrap your mind around its unfamiliar idioms. If you are a new (or even not-so-new) user of Mathematica today, you
are simultaneously in a better and a much worse position than I was with version 3.0.
You are in a better position because Mathematica 7.0 is vastly more powerful than 3.0 was back then. Not only has the number of available functions doubled, but Mathematica has fundamental new capabilities including dynamic interactivity, curated data sources, parallel processing, image processing, and much more. You are in a worse position because there is much more to learn! As Mathematica grows, it remains largely unchanged in its core principles. This book is designed to help you master those core principles by presenting Mathematica in the context of real-world problems. However, my goal is not just to show you how to solve problems in Mathematica, but to show you how to do so in a way that plays to Mathematica’s strengths. This means there is an emphasis on symbolic, functional, and pattern-based styles of programming. Mathematica is a multi-paradigm programming language; you can easily write code in it that a Fortran or C programmer would have little trouble following. However, the procedural style that this entails is not likely to give you good performance. More importantly, it will often cause you to write more code than necessary and spend more time adapting that code to future problems. Stephen Wolfram has said that a correct Mathematica program is often a short Mathematica program. There is much truth to this. The truth comes from the idea that good Mathematica programs leverage the capabilities of the vast built-in library of both general-purpose and highly specialized functions. Programming in Mathematica is a search for the right combination of primitives. My hope is that this cookbook will play a role as your guide.

Yii Application Development Cookbook

YiiThe Yii framework is a rapidly growing PHP5 MVC framework often referred to as Rails for PHP. It has already become a solid base for many exciting web applications such as Stay.com and can be a good base for your developments, too.

This book will help you to learn Yii quickly and in more depth for use in for your developments. Yii Application Development Cookbook will show you how to use Yii efficiently. You will learn about taking shortcuts using core features, creating your own reusable code base, using test driven development, and many more topics that will give you a lot of experience in a moderate amount of time.